Silhouette figures of a male and female with their legs crossed and their hands in front of their crotch as if they have to urinate.

My Drinking Problem

Because of the weakness caused by my neuromuscular disease, I have relied on other people to help me go to the bathroom for the past eleven years. Since 2007, I have timed my use of the toilet around when and where I will have proximity to an accessible toilet AND a Personal Assistant (PA), sister, cousin, friend, neighbor, or other kind person I could coerce¬†ask to help me. I have restricted my fluid intake to coordinate, as best as I can estimate, with other people’s schedules and the times I will be near toilets I can safely use.

I wrote about my battle with “pee math” in this post.¬†Since I have been so open about my methods over the years, I was surprised by the number of friends who did not know this was a routine for me. But, things are changing!

As you might remember, six weeks ago I had my suprapubic catheter tube (SP Tube) placed. According to the surgeon, the procedure “was textbook,” and went well. There were no complications from anesthesia. I remember being wheeled into the operating room with bright tropical fish painted on the walls. The breathing mask went over my face and the next thing I knew, I was waking up in the recovery room.

My SP Tube means I no longer need to sit on a toilet to urinate. Instead, urine freely flows out of the SP Tube to a collection bag. During the day, I wear a bag strapped to my leg. At night, I connect to a larger bag that hangs on the side of my bed.

I am now free to drink without the worry of how I will get on a toilet, or who will help me, or when it will happen. If I want to have an additional cup of coffee, I don’t have to think about where I will be in the afternoon and if I will have a PA with me to help me transfer on to the toilet. Now, I just drink the coffee! Or the juice. Or the water. Or the wine. Or whatever I want!

When I am at work, I can have as much water as I want! The first day I returned to work after surgery, I drank five, yes, FIVE, 16 ounce glasses of water. Granted, I had to dump my leg bag five times as a result. But I was not dehydrating myself because of lack of access to help and an accessible bathroom.

Drinking as much as I want, whenever I want, has created new challenges I have not had to face for several years. For the first time in a decade, I have to worry about accessible public restrooms.

I know – it sounds strange to hear a disabled woman admit she hasn’t worried about accessible public restrooms on a regular basis. I haven’t used them for a decade. Sure, I’ve always known it was an important issue. But, it wasn’t an issue for me so I spent my advocacy energy on other matters. At least, I did until the end of April.

Not all so-called “accessible” restrooms are actually usable. Disabled people know this but most non-disabled people do not. Most non-disabled people see grab bars next to a toilet and think the bathroom is accessible. Grab bars are not the only feature that make an “accessible” restroom usable. In addition to grab bars, accessible restrooms must minimally have:

  • Accessible sinks that can be operated with a closed fist (no faucet knobs that require grasping and turning)
  • Soap and paper towel dispensers and mirrors mounted at lower heights
  • Lever doorhandles or handles that can be operated with a closed fist
  • Doors that do not require more than 5 pounds of pull force pressure to open

The majority of bathroom doors open into the bathroom rather than out. This is probably so people walking in a hallway don’t get whacked by someone opening the bathroom door. While I understand that rationale, there are usually more people outside a bathroom than inside. If I can’t open a door because it requires more force than I can generate, I stand a greater chance of finding someone outside a bathroom to help me than I do inside the bathroom.

Since I had my SP Tube placed, I have been stuck inside six public restrooms because the door was too heavy for me to pull open. I now take my phone into the bathroom with me each and every time I go. If I am with a group of people, I ask them to come rescue me if I don’t return after five minutes in the bathroom. Last week I learned if there are multiple bathrooms, it is helpful to tell your colleagues which bathroom you are actually going to if you make this request. My friend Melissa dutifully came looking for me after I requested a rescue not knowing I was in the bathroom on the other side of the building. She sent me a text saying, You good? I just checked the bathroom and you are not there…

I am still learning how my body behaves with all of this extra fluid intake. There are still timing issues related to drinking, particularly when planning paratransit bus trips. It’s not fun to ride around on a bus for an hour with a leg bag that is full to the bursting point. Thankfully, I have not had any messes or spills.

Next week, I will return to the pool – the last step in resuming all of my activities. It will feel wonderful to return to the water, and I miss my swimming buddies.

Right now, I need to go grab a drink. I’m empty!

Advertisements