The words "30 days of thanks" in cursive writing on a green square.

A Week After 30 Days

It has been just over a week since my last 30 Days of Thanks post. As I do after each blogging challenge, I have been reflecting on this experience and trying to gather my thoughts into something worth posting. Although this is my third time completing this challenge, there are still lessons I am learning along the way.

1. Guests are Great!

This was the first year I asked others to consider taking part in my 30 Days of Thanks. I’ll be honest and admit I did this for selfish reasons. Guest posts meant less content I had to create myself. I am taking a memoir writing course this year, and the daily writing required for the course takes up time I would have otherwise used for my blog posts.

Thankfully, several of my friends took me up on my invitation to write, granting me the privilege of sharing their amazing work to my loyal readers. Reading their work also caused me to stop and think about their writing, how they crafted their messages, what devices they used effectively and how I might try to incorporate these in my future writing. I am grateful for their generosity, but embarrassed to admit…

2. I Left Out a Post.

Early in my blogging life, I connected with a delightful writer, Lily. This year, Lily branched out and started writing about daily random acts of kindness on a new blog. I asked her if she would be willing to write a piece for my 30 Days of Thanks. Lily wrote a very insightful piece, thanking a man who broke her heart. I was honored she offered it to me and scheduled it (I thought) to appear in late November. Then, two days before it was to post, I realized it was not in my list of posts. What’s more, I couldn’t find the email and file containing the post. I panicked. I searched late one night then went to bed, promising to do it first thing in the morning. Only, I didn’t do it because work, Personal Assistant illness, life – you pick it. I forgot. I forgot to fix my mistake, and I never ran Lily’s post. I have apologized to Lily, and I hope she will forgive me and let me make it up to her. Now I’m owning up to all of you, because I feel like I’ve let Lily down and I dislike being the cause of anyone’s disappointment.

3. “Not All Rock Stars Play Guitar.”

Prior to last month, I averaged 50 blog visitors per post. The largest number of visitors to DeeScribes in one day occurred in September 2015 when I wrote the post, I Never Said He Wasn’t Being Kind. Two hundred seventy six visitors read that post, a record which held until November 22 when I wrote this post about my friend Mike. Within two hours of posting, I had 50 visitors. The post was shared by multiple people and then Mike shared it. After eight hours, it had been seen by over 200 people. I knew before I went to bed that night it had broken my prior “daily record” and was approaching 290.

I can never predict what will resonate with readers, and what will appeal to a large number of people. I am convinced if you put a photo of an attractive man in uniform with your post, your blog stats will improve for the day. I told Mike I planned to use his photo with a random post just to test my theory sometime. He’s the one who gave me the quote at the start of this section, as well as the story for an amazing day on my blog. Thanks again Mike. You and the other officers are definitely getting cookies this year.

4. People Like to be Surprised with a Thank You Note.

Before I write and share my 30 Days of Thanks posts, I always ask the subjects of my posts if they will permit me to share my thank you note to them on my blog. Only one person has ever refused, and of course I honored her wishes. This year, for the first time, I wrote posts about each of my sisters without telling them in advance I planned to feature them individually. Once the first post about Sandy went live, Donna, Susan and Caroline knew their own posts would be coming. But, I did not share my posts with them in advance. They all responded to the memories I shared, and sent me delightful notes or comments in return. I’m glad I took the time to write separate posts for all of them as gifts for all they do for me.

Thank you to everyone who supported me and my guest bloggers through my 30 Days of Thanks challenge. I am grateful for your comments and shares. I hope you will continue to practice daily gratitude for the people and blessings in your life. And if you have time, send someone a thank you note. It will make their day.

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30 Days of Thanks Day 30 – The Pool Gang

I have never been a fan of exercise. This is partly because it is difficult for me to physically move my body, and exercise requires movement to be effective. It is also partly because I have never experienced the endorphin rush that is described by others who enjoy exercise. I don’t feel good when I exercise. I just feel fatigued and tired.

The only form of exercise I can do is aquatic therapy in a therapeutic pool. There are three accessible therapeutic pools in my area, and each one is at least a half hour drive from where I live. So, getting to the pool is a four hour commitment – 40 minutes to drive there, time to get undressed and transfer to a pool chair to go in, an hour in the pool, an hour to shower and get dressed, and 40 minutes to get back home. Add the fact that I need another person to accompany me for any of this to happen, and I don’t get to the pool that often.

Or rather, I didn’t get to the pool that often before May. But now that I am still trying to get stronger and recover from my femur fracture? I have become a regular at the Sunnyview Hospital therapeutic pool on Mondays and Wednesdays for the 7 AM open swim.

Today I give thanks for the other regulars at the pool. Jose, Chip, Dominick, Alberto, Susan, Tom, Sister Joan, Sue, The Doctor and his wife (I still don’t know their names after 6 months), Will, Debbie, and the others who sometimes cycle through welcomed me and my Personal Assistant Tina with open arms. They offer support and encouragement to everyone in the pool. When someone is absent, they worry. If someone has good news, they celebrate.

I still haven’t turned into a person who loves to exercise. But I look forward to spending time with my morning friends in the pool. The comraderie between us is positive and uplifting. As Tina put it when I read her a draft of this post driving to the pool this morning, it’s like we’re one big family.

Recovering from an illness or injury is difficult and requires determination and stamina. Having a peer support group keeps me focused. I know they will question me if I start to slack off. Last week when I walked for the first time while submerged in the pool they gave me kudos.

Thank you to my morning friends who greet me each Monday and Wednesday. I appreciate you welcoming me into the fold. There’s no better way to start the day.

30 Days of Thanks Day 29 – Donna

I share many traits and have many similarities to my five older sisters. People tell us we look alike, sound alike and talk alike. We all played musical instruments and were active in school music groups. And we all love to read.

My sister Donna is one of my regular reading buddies. Donna is fourteen years older than me, and I’m certain she is one of the reasons I love to lose myself in a good book. I often joke that my older sisters taught me to read at a young age because they were tired of reading to me. Donna would come home from college and I would pounce on her, begging her to play with me or read to me. Often, playing involved Donna curling my long hair, partaking in a tea party, and then reading as many books as I could convince her to read.

Donna and I regularly swap book and audiobook recommendations. Donna understands that a good book can be a valuable escape, and I have done my best to escape a great deal this past year. I told her about Tina Fey’s Bossy Pants, which I listened to during my stay at Sunnyview Rehabilitation Hospital. She told me about a Jack Reacher mystery. We discussed Daniel Silva’s characters on the phone while I was recuperating at home. She mailed a copy of a book about a group of friends who start a cookie swap.

Donna lives in Florida, so I see her about once a year. Our visits are never long enough, but Donna does a wonderful job of staying in touch because Donna is the best card giver in the world. I don’t know how she does it, or how much time she must spend looking through the racks of greeting cards to find the perfect card. But, she always manages to get cards which are just right for every occasion.

This year, Donna sent me funny cards when I was in the hospital and needed a laugh. Then, one day when I was particularly low, a note of encouragement showed up with her return address on it. Sometimes Donna’s cards contain newspaper articles she has read which remind her of me. She surprised me with a clipping about a friend of mine, a former Ms. Wheelchair Florida, who lives about an hour away from her home. The penguin bookmark she sent me is inside a book next to my bed.

Five years ago, Donna flew up for my nephew’s wedding in Ticonderoga, NY. After a beautiful fall day on the shores of Lake George in the Adirondack mountains, I followed Donna and our sister Sandy into town where we had reservations at a local hotel. What followed was an adventure that still cracks us up – involving a convenience store restroom, men dressed in British Redcoats a la the American Revolution, the three of us sharing a king size bed at a Super 8 Motel, and getting lost in the village. We still laugh until we cry when we talk about the night we spent a weekend in Ticonderoga. I bet you she’s laughing right now after reading this.

Donna always makes me laugh. She brings so much humor into my life, making me realize there is always a reason to smile even when facing difficulties and obstacles.

Thank you Donna, for being a bright spot so frequently this year. I love our book discussions, even though my “to read” list grows every time we talk. Your little gifts make me think of you, bringing you closer to me even though you live far away. I am grateful you are not just my sister, but one of my dearest friends. I do my best to emulate your generosity and compassion for others. I just wish I had time and patience to find perfect cards for you. This post will have to do for now.

A woman seated in a wheelchair wearing a long pink dress and a pink shawl sits next to a woman wearing a black dress. The woman in the wheelchair has brown hair and is wearing glasses. She has a camera on her lap. The woman standing next to her is holding a glass and a blue shawl.

30 Days of Thanks Day 28 – Guest Post by Via Mari

My final guest for this month is Via Mari. We “met” through an online writing group and learned we shared a love of travel. I enjoy learning about Via’s research process, and the importance of keen observation when it comes to getting the details right when describing a location in writing. I am excited to share her gratitude post as we near the end of 30 Days of Thanks. You can read more of her work, including descriptions of her books and insights as to how she researches her writing, over at her blog.

Thankful for Memories

When I think of thankfulness so many things come to mind, but as I ponder what I am really thankful for this year it has to be my memories.

As a young girl, I recall waking up in England and following the scent of mom’s baked goods down the stairs to the kitchen below. The large walnut crank- out table was the place we gathered to eat the sweet, flaky pastries and drink the robust black tea which mom always cooled slightly for me with a little milk and sugar.

As a teenager, I recall shopping with mom for special occasion dresses. It’s the laughter and the fact that I could tell her anything that I remember so vividly. We would spend hours talking through all life’s little troubles as we went from boutique to boutique. Together we would search until we found the perfect dresses. The little frilly red and white ones for holidays and pictures with family, a long pale yellow formal for my first dance, and a flowing midnight blue sparkly strapless for prom and another short, more sophisticated black strappy dress with sequins for the young woman who was about to graduate. Then it was the wedding dress, the ultimate pursuit. Bridal shows, boutique after boutique, day after day of laughter and talking until we found the simple, classic white dress I would be married in.

As a young woman, I recall my children enjoying the same holiday customs I experienced as a child. My mother’s traditions of baking Gramma’s homemade yeast rolls from scratch, the sausage and apple stuffing which would be lovingly prepared to accompany the turkey, and engaging them in the laughter and conversation that was always so much a part of the day.

As a woman today, I sit quietly watching my mom interact with our extended family. I am thankful for all the memories we are making and that I will have the ability to look back and remember every extraordinary thing about my mom today.

30 Days of Thanks Day 27 – Christy and Mike

Twenty six years ago, my high school friend Vicki moved to the city I now call home for a new job. I met her roommate, Christy, when Vicki, Stephanie and I helped plan our friend Allison’s bridal shower. We held the shower in the community room of my apartment complex. A few months later, I saw Christy and Vicki again at Allison’s wedding where we danced and laughed all afternoon.

Two years ago, I saw someone who looked like Christy walking across the parking lot in front of my apartment. I thought about the fun times we had the summer of Allison’s wedding, and told myself I should do a better job of keeping in touch with long lost friends. I didn’t think about it again until I got a Facebook message from Christy a few days later.

Hey – do you still live in Strawberry Ridge? I think we’re neighbors!

Sure enough, Christy and her husband Mike had moved into an apartment in the building across the parking lot from my old apartment. Since I’m always looking for new people to add to my local support network, I was excited to have another friend close by.

Christy and Mike were great neighbors. They helped clean my car off when it snowed if nobody else had gotten to it. A few mornings when I was stuck without a Personal Assistant, Christy came over to help me get out of bed. The three of us spent a lively day at Saratoga Race Course a delightful young-at-heart friend of theirs. They kept a spare set of my car keys in case of an emergency while I was in Australia.

When I fell in January, I sent a message to Christy asking her to keep an eye on things while I was in the hospital. Christy and Mike came to visit me, bringing cheer and positive energy on a night when I was not happy with the prospect of an extended stay in rehabilitation.

Whatever you need when you get home, just let us know.

This past summer, Christy and Mike volunteered to help me move. They spent a Saturday packing box after box, taping and labeling at top speed. Seriously, those two are pros and had my living room and kitchen packed in no time!

Living down in town means I have more freedom to take part in town activities. In September, I was able to walk down to the harbor to meet Christy and Mike for the annual Tug Boat Round-Up. We walked along the canal, snapping photos of the tugs, talking while Mike (a former Navy sailor) toured the boats.

Thank you Christy and Mike for being great neighbors and loyal friends. I appreciate your willingness to help me and I’m grateful you were willing to join my circle of support. We’ll have to plan something fun together this winter, and I promise it won’t involve packing tape!