I’m Fine Without a Valentine

If you ask my closest friends, they will tell you I am a romantic. Of course, I will deny it at first, even though deep down I know it’s true.

I love love. I love doing nice things for those I love. I love giving unique gifts I know will be loved and appreciated by the recipient.

But I don’t love Valentine’s Day.

It’s not because I have spent the vast majority of Valentine’s Days without a romantic love. Granted, this will be the 24th Valentine’s Day since I was 18 years old and I have only had a romantic love for 4 of those days.

Yes, I love having a romantic partner when that is a part of my life. It is thrilling to have someone who honors your vulnerability and likes you anyway; someone who shares intimate secrets and sends your dopamine levels soaring with compliments and kisses.

However, my self-worth has never been tied to having a romantic relationship with a man. I have always been comfortable on my own, not really able to understand those people who felt like they needed someone to “complete them,” or make them “whole.”

Some of my friends tell me it’s just because I haven’t met my “soul mate,” the person I am “supposed to be with.” They tell me to just hang on and when the time is right, “Mr. Right will come along.” What if I’m alright without a Mr. Right?

My dislike of Valentine’s Day is not because I have not been exposed to extended romantic relationships. My parents celebrated their 63rd anniversary last July, six months prior to my father’s death in December. My grandparents, aunts and uncles, sisters and brothers-in-law, many friends – all examples of strong marriages and relationships I am blessed to witness.

I certainly don’t dislike Valentine’s Day because love is absent from my life. I am fortunate to have a wide circle of support, love and affection from a variety of friends and family. These connections are central to my feeling of well-being and happiness. They sustain me when times are challenging and help me celebrate the good.

Maybe my dislike of this day meant for lovers stems from the fact that even if I found romantic love and wanted to get married, marriage is not a realistic option for me due to my disability and my need for long term care. Like most people who receive home care for an extended length of time, I rely on Medicaid to pay for my Personal Assistants. Thanks to the New York Medicaid Buy-In Program for Working People with Disabilities (MBIWPD), I am allowed to work and earn more income than allowed in traditional Medicaid and still qualify for Medicaid coverage.

Medicaid eligibility can be complex, and is based on a number of variables such as income and resources. It also varies from state to state. As a single person without a disability or dependents, using 2015 income and resource levels found on the New York State Department of Health website, I would qualify for Medicaid as long as my income is less than $1,343 per month or $16,105 annually. As a person with a disability, I would qualify if my income was less than $825 per month, or $9,900 annually. However, as a single person receiving services through the MBIWPD in my state, I can earn up to approximately $60,000 annually (the exact amount changes each year) and remain eligible for Medicaid as long as I meet the asset limitations. I qualify if I am employed full or part time. I am eligible for insurance through my employer, so my traditional preventive healthcare is covered by that policy. Insurance does not pay for long term care though. Medicaid pays for the personal care I need to remain an active member in my community.

But if I marry? A married couple can only have a joint income of approximately $81,000 annually to qualify for services.

I am authorized to receive 70 hours of home care each week. If I were to pay out of pocket for this care, it would cost me approximately $20/hour. That is $1,400 each week, or $72,800 a year. Just for personal care. That is more than my current annual salary, since I cannot earn more than $60,000 and still qualify for home care.

I have always said I will never put myself in a situation where my safety and security are dependent on another person. Part of it is my own independent stubborn streak, and part of it comes from conditioning from my parents who told me repeatedly as I was growing up how important it is that I be able to take care of myself. If I were to marry, I would need to find another job with a higher salary to cover the cost of my care, never mind my living expenses.

Sure, I could find a job that pays more than $100,00/year. Those jobs exist. I have the degrees and skills to be successful at those jobs. But as much as I complain about playing the Medicaid game (proving my disability every six months, tolerating the home visits from nurses and social workers to assess my needs), I play it because I need to. I am dependent on these services to live independently in my community where I am loved and valued, and can give love to those who are important to me.

That’s the love that matters most to me.

However, if anyone has any leads on “Mr. Right,” I’m not opposed to having some fun… 😉

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2 thoughts on “I’m Fine Without a Valentine

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