Going Up

Last week, my wheelchair died. I had just transferred from my chair into bed on Tuesday night, and decided to start moving it out of the way while waiting for my Personal Assistant (PA) to put the transfer board down. Only, when I pushed the joystick nothing happened.

I’m not a stranger to this. Sometimes, I don’t wait long enough for the drive motors to engage before trying to drive. I’m impatient. I like to go when I want to go. But, I know there is a start up sequence that has to run and if you try to operate the chair before it is ready, it won’t go. You’ll push on the joystick and nothing will happen.

So, last Tuesday night I did what I always do. I counted to five and tried again. Still nothing. I turned the chair off, then turned it back on and waited for another five seconds.

Zero movement.

My chair has a powered seat, so I tried those controls next. The seat base elevates and moves forward and backward, giving me more clear floor space in front of my chair during transfers. My seat elevator also makes it possible for me to reach higher objects, rise to a standing height during speaking engagements, and helps me get my own drink off the bar when I am out with friends instead of relying on others.

Last Tuesday when I tested the seat controls, it moved forward and backwards but did not change height. This was a problem because it was elevated. I elevate it most of the time I transfer out of my chair because, well, gravity still works. It’s easier to go from higher to lower than to transfer uphill.

The final piece of the puzzle came to light when I looked at the screen on my joystick. Highlighted in yellow was the message “drive fault.” This told me it was probably either the joystick, the controller (the computer brain of the chair) or the drive motor. None of them were good possibilities, but without a diagnostic tool I couldn’t do anything further. I had my PA disengage the drive motors, push my good chair out of my bedroom and get my old clunker chair out of my office.

Thank goodness I listened to Bob, my wheelchair repair guru, when he told me to put new batteries in my old clunker. Sure the old clunker isn’t comfortable to sit in for long periods of time, and I wasn’t sure how I would manage in it with formerly fractured femur, but at least the chair was made to my measurements. Five years ago, this was my daily chair. Even if it had outlived it’s daily use, it would be better than a loaner which didn’t fit me.

I used my clunker last Wednesday while Bob ran diagnostics on my chair. Of course, when my PA brought the chair to the shop, it worked perfectly. Try as he might, Bob couldn’t get the chair to fail. From how I described the error code, Bob was fairly certain it was the seat elevator, not the joystick, motors or controller. He played with some loose wires, adjusted the seat elevator actuator (a known problem on prior repairs to my chair) and arranged for delivery of my chair back to me later that day.

Fast forward to this morning, a week later. I drove my chair under the bathroom sink after breakfast, ready to brush my teeth. I activated the seat controls and moved my joystick to elevate my chair. All normal activities, except the chair didn’t move. Ugh.

Opponents of funding for complex medical technology always say adaptations like seat elevators are luxury items and not really necessary for people like me. Luxury? Well, here is a list of things I have not been able to independently perform in the 90 minutes since noticing my broken seat elevator:

  • I have not been able to brush my teeth. The bathroom and kitchen sinks are too high for me to access without my seat elevator. I could grab a cup to use as a spit cup but…
  • I can’t reach the cups in the cabinets because I can’t elevate my wheelchair. No access to cups means nothing to use to help me brush my teeth or take a drink.
  • I can’t wash my face  – another task requiring the ability to reach the sink.
  • I can’t get my sweater off the hook behind my bedroom door. I’ve tried using my reacher. It doesn’t give me enough height.

I’ve already called Bob. He’s going to look at my chair as soon as my PA gets it to him. Thank goodness for Bob. Every wheelchair user needs a Bob, and those of us who have a Bob know how fortunate we are.

 

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10 thoughts on “Going Up

  1. Very frustrating, I’m sure. So glad, however, that you continually share these situations, raising awareness for those that may not otherwise understand the implications of the importance of a lift. I’m glad that you have Bob and have no doubt you’ll be able to reach your drink at the bar again soon!!

    Like

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