Future or Present?

Today, December 3, is International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPWD), a day designated by the United Nations to increase public awareness, understanding and acceptance of people with disabilities. The theme for this year is Achieving 17 Goals for the Future We Want.”  The theme relates to the 17 Sustainable Development Goals which were recently adopted by the United Nations. Of particular note, this year marks the 10th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), an international treaty not yet ratified by my country but embraced by many other countries around the world.

While I think it is important to consider how we can work to incorporate people of all abilities into our plans for the future, I am too mired in what it means to live as a disabled person in the present to get excited over this year’s IDPWD theme. Personally, I spend too much time ensuring my basic needs are met here and now to think about what will happen next week, next month, next year.

Of course, I do worry about the future. I am concerned about what will happen if Medicaid, the federal government program which funds long term support services such as home care for most people with disabilities, is turned into a block grant program. I am concerned about how people with pre-existing conditions will access healthcare if the new administration is successful at it’s pledge to dismantle the Affordable Care Act. I hear stories like this NPR story about a 7 year wait to access services in Kansas, and I shiver, knowing I would be dead if I lost my services and had to wait 7 years for them to be reinstated.

But even though I worry about the future, I recognize the changes made in my lifetime which afford me access to the community in which I live. I was lucky enough to have been born in the United States at a time when education laws requiring free and appropriate education for all children were changing. As a result, I was “mainstreamed” and completed my education in the public community school alongside my nondisabled peers. I started college a year after the Americans With Disabilities Act, a crucial piece of civil rights legislation, was signed. I had access to paratransit transportation which allowed me to complete required internships and student teaching experiences. Throughout my professional life, I have had the right to request and receive reasonable accommodations which allow me to maintain employment. All of the sidewalks in my town have curb cuts, giving me freedom to explore and access my community without fear of not being able to cross the street.

Does discrimination still happen? Of course. I know there are times when I walk into a room of strangers and people notice the shiny red wheelchair attached to my butt, making assumptions about me based on that first visual impression of the wheelchair rather than me as an individual. At least once a month, someone tells me they would rather die than live as a disabled person, dependent on someone else to complete everyday personal tasks.

Are there still barriers to full participation? Of course. Yesterday I had to go to a local shopping mall and I was not able to leave when I wanted to because some idiot parked illegally in the access aisle next to my van, preventing me from deploying my van ramp and entering my vehicle. Lucky me, they were still parked there when the police arrived to issue a ticket. I hope the driver appreciates my holiday gift which comes with a $125 fine. ‘Tis the season for giving, after all.

Even though there are laws requiring places of public accommodation to meet accessibility standards, does that mean I can go anywhere I want? No, as I discovered last night when I stopped at a local business to pick up company gifts for my employer’s holiday party only to be greeted by steps. Granted, the staff were nice enough to bring the items out to me, but they won’t be receiving any more business from me or the company I represent. Money talks, and I refuse to give any of it to businesses which are not accessible to me.

Things are changing for people with disabilities, no doubt. Social media and technology make it easier for people with disabilities to share their own stories, in their own voices. I actually started today by helping to share tweets from Australian advocates when I woke at 5:15 AM my time and found the #criparmy and #pissonpity hashtags in several IDPWD posts. I debated writing my own post in recognition of IDPWD and ultimately decided I had to practice what I preach and use my own blog to signal boost the day.

I hope my regular readers will take some time this weekend to search the #IDPWD hashtag and read what disabled writers are sharing. There is also a Disability Blogger Linkup over at my friend Andrew’s blog, Disability Thinking. Listen to my friend Emily’s podcast, The Accessible Stall where she and Kyle tackle issues important to many in the disability community.

Why should you care about the issues we raise? Why do our advocacy efforts matter to you? Because everyone will either be a temporary or permanent member of the disability community at some point in life. And shouldn’t we all be concerned with basic human rights for everyone, regardless of ability?

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6 thoughts on “Future or Present?

  1. Wow, a lot of information here. I hope you can continue to be a “light” for all. This post feels more like the academic side of you-I enjoy reading about these issues. You raise very valid points.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great post as always. What’s more frustrating than your van ramp being blocked? I really think that should carry a charge of false imprisonment. I’m guessing you were locked out, not in, but one Kristen was locked in her van by someone who refused to move their car out of the access aisle. I hate reading or recounting these stories. ugh

    Liked by 1 person

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