Driving Me Crazy

A few months ago, I shared a post about how excited I was to be driving again after my femur fracture. Several of you responded with excitement and cheered me on in my continued rehabilitation. Then, a couple of weeks ago I casually mentioned how I was not independently driving. This caused several readers to reach out to me with questions about my driving. I have been meaning to write about this but other things interfered. The time seems right now, so let me take some time to explain what is up with driving.

For the past fourteen years, I have driven modified minivans. These vans have ramps on the side, which allow me to wheel my chair directly inside the middle section of the van, behind the driver and front passenger seats. I do not drive from my wheelchair. Instead, I lock my chair in place behind the driver’s seat. My van has a transfer seat base under the driver’s seat which allows the seat to rotate and move forward and back. For fourteen years, I have transferred in and out of my driver’s seat to drive. The only photo I have which somewhat shows this process is this picture snapped by my best friend at the start of a 2012 road trip.

A woman wearing a white shirt sits inside a gray minivan. The passenger side door of the van is open, and the woman is seated on a driver's seat transfer base, which is rotated facing the open door. She is looking out the door as she slides from her wheelchair into the driver's seat.
Half on the driver’s seat, half on the chair – almost ready to hit the road in my van Clyde! Yes, he has a name.

I do not drive from my wheelchair. I do not drive with hand controls. That’s right. I use my feet to operate the gas and brake, and use both hands to operate the steering wheel. If I drive from the driver’s seat, I do not require any further modifications to drive. Most people are surprised to learn this tidbit, and it plays a role in this story.

Things changed when I fractured my femur. As I shared on my blog, transferring in and out of my driver’s seat was difficult, and took time and rehabilitation. I was thrilled when I was able to get in my van and drive – and I still can do that. What I can’t do independently is transfer OUT of my driver’s seat back into my wheelchair.

Right now, I can get in my van and drive myself to my destination. I just can’t be certain I’ll be able to get out when I get there. What’s more, the effort and energy required for me to complete these transfers is frankly, not worth it. I have limited energy, and when I have to transfer repeatedly, I don’t have energy to do the other things I need and want to do in my day. The time has come for me to admit it is time to drive from my wheelchair.

Driving from my wheelchair may sound easy, but it is not just as simple as removing the driver’s seat. Everything changes if I try to drive from my wheelchair. In order to safely drive from my wheelchair I require a complex high-tech driving system. I have not had a new driving evaluation completed yet, but you can see a photo of a “complex high-tech driving system” which I will probably require by visiting this website or searching other sites. The last time I had a driving evaluation completed, the instructor told me I could drive from the driver’s seat without any modifications, or else drive from my wheelchair with “every bell and whistle, high-tech, electronic system known to man.”

Knowing I needed to make a change, understanding that I would not be able to put the system I will need in my current 2003 vehicle, I began the process for getting a new van. For those who are unfamiliar with the steps involved in buying an accessible vehicle in New York (my state), let me fill you in.

  1. Modified vehicles are expensive. The government requires most disabled people to live in poverty, with very little resources and savings, in order to maintain the services they require to meet their daily needs (see prior posts here and here for more information). This is why so many disabled people turn to crowd-funding and other fundraisers when they need to buy new vehicles. Rather than do that right now, I am using my state vocational rehabilitation program (ACCESS-VR) to assist me with the purchase of a new van.
  2. The ACCESS-VR process is a LONG process. I was approved for services in August (yeah!) but have yet to receive any services. On September 20, I received a letter telling me I was approved for a high-tech driving evaluation. I am drafting this post on October 5 and today I just received a phone call about scheduling my evaluation because….
  3. ACCESS-VR is a state agency. Any work the state pays for can only be completed by approved vendors. The state has one vendor – ONE VENDOR – in all of New York that is approved to conduct a high-tech driving evaluation. That vendor is in Rochester – 232 miles away from where I live on the eastern side of the state. I’ve spoken to Brian, the man who conducts these evaluations. He seems like a very nice man. During our conversation he told me he has been traveling almost non-stop. I believe it, because I know I am not the only disabled person in the state of New York who is itching to have her independence back. However, even though Brian is a nice guy, he is still 232 miles away. But….
  4. Brian is going to come to me for my driving evaluation! This is important, because since my femur fracture I can only go to the bathroom using the commode in my house. Well, I can go to the bathroom at my sister’s house because she purchased the same commode for me to use when I visit. Other than at my house and my sister’s house, I don’t use the toilet. This makes travel almost impossible. It makes a 232 mile trek across the state a logistical nightmare. If Brian didn’t come to me, I would have to wait even longer for a driving evaluation.

After this process, I can finally move to the process of actually purchasing the vehicle and equipment. That process deserves its own post, as this one is already over 1,000 words. I haven’t even begun to think about learning to drive with this new equipment, and having to practice for my road test with hand controls. I last took a road test in 1992 when I was 18 years old. I was driving my very first car, Grandpa A – a maroon Chrysler LeBaron with a bench seat in front. The man sent to accompany me on my road test was over six feet tall and had to sit sideways on the front seat because I had it to pull it forward to reach the pedals.

So, that’s the story with driving. If I am lucky, (read – if paperwork gets moved quickly and the process is not slowed down along the way, and I don’t have to wait months for driving instruction, and Scorpio goes in retrograde or something) I will be driving a new van by July of next year. In the meantime, I am rediscovering the joys of the local paratransit system and trying to practice patience. And drinking lots of wine.

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