Redefining Disability Challenge – Question 39

Each Wednesday, I post my response to a question from the Redefining Disability Challenge. This is my response to the thirty-ninth question in the Challenge. As usual, I am not looking ahead to future questions, so I may inadvertently address some topics which will come up later in the Challenge. Here is this week’s question:

What technological advancements are you hoping to see in the future?

I know technology has made a meaningful difference in so many lives, particularly the lives of those living with disability. Text messaging has increased communication for the Deaf and hearing impaired. Dictation software has made it possible for people with limited dexterity to type and write. My elevating wheelchair seat makes it possible for me to transfer to the toilet. Trust me – that is HUGE when it comes to my quality of life.

While technology has improved my ability to engage in the world around me, I am not waiting anxiously for future technological advancements.

I often see videos with prototypes of new wheelchairs or exoskeletons – devices which will, in theory, make a physical impairment less disabling. When I see them, part of my brain twitches and says, “What is wrong with me functioning as I am? What if I don’t want to interact with the world the same way everyone else does?”

There were times in my younger days when I wanted new technology. In the late 1990’s, I eagerly investigated push-assist wheels as a way to avoid transitioning to a power wheelchair. Once I started using a power chair in 2002, I couldn’t wait to have an elevating wheelchair seat. My first roller-bar mouse in 2007 was an answer to many complaints about the physical pain caused by needing to move my hand off the keyboard to manipulate a mouse, and made it possible for me to continue to type for long periods of time.

But now, I just want the world to welcome me as I am. I don’t want a wheelchair that is able to climb up steps like a tank. I want an entrance which everyone can use with ease – whether they walk or use a mobility device. I don’t want gene therapy to replace my “damaged” genetic material. I want to continue to have access to consumer directed home care in the community, rather than an institution. I don’t want to be viewed as an inspiration for simply getting out of bed and showing up. I want people to expect more from someone with my talents and abilities who just happens to use a wheelchair for mobility.

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5 thoughts on “Redefining Disability Challenge – Question 39

  1. Maybe it’s the scifi nerd in me. I don’t have a problem with prototypes and even tested one when I was younger. I don’t think it’s about there being anything “wrong” with how I function now, but exoskeletons in particular add whole levels of access. You don’t have to use one just because it exists. If I’d had one in my teens/20s, I could have joined the Marines (one of my ambitions at the time.) We can argue that the military should just be open to me whether I can walk or not, but the fact is a Marine is often sent to places where a wheelchair would be a liability, and I did NOT want a desk job.

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    • I think technology will continue to offer amazing opportunities for many. And I don’t have any negative feelings towards anyone who embraces all technology has to offer. I think we will see some amazing things.

      Liked by 1 person

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