30 Days of Thanks Day 5 – My Work Colleagues

Not everyone gets up in the morning and looks forward to spending their day at work. They gripe about their co-workers. They complain about their supervisors. They wish they didn’t have to go to their job because they don’t find purpose or meaning in their work.

If these people worked in my office, they would not feel this way.

My paid employment is at a non-profit company, Consumer Directed Choices. It was founded by my friend Constance and a group of people with disabilities and their families in 1997. CDChoices has been operational since 2001 and I joined the team in 2012 as the Communications and Outreach Specialist.

As an agency, we are what is known as a Fiscal Intermediary for Consumers – seniors and people with disabilities – who self-direct their homecare using Consumer Directed Personal Assistance. We administer wages and benefits for the more than 1,200 Personal Assistants (PAs) employed by our Consumers. This allows our Consumers (people like me) to recruit, train, supervise, manage and terminate the PAs they employ.

I call Consumer Directed Personal Assistance the program which lets me “be the CEO of me.” I get to handle personnel – the staff I hire who assist me at home. And CDChoices is my fiscal partner, making sure my staff get paid. That is a simplistic way to explain what we actually do in the office.

What my colleagues do is not just process timesheets and other administrative work. They allow people to live self-directed lives of empowerment. Because they are all committed to the mission and vision of providing and advancing community supports to promote self-direction, there are more than 600 people with disabilities (like me) in the greater Capital Region of New York who do not live in nursing homes or other institutions. Instead we are living in the community, with our families and friends.

My colleagues don’t just follow the mission at work, they live it daily. Many of them have personal or family connections to people with disabilities so they understand the importance of respect and dignity for everyone. Some of them have worked for other disability service organizations and are drawn to this work because they want to make a difference.

Most importantly, my colleagues are kind, compassionate individuals who are willing to assist others. Two years ago when I was unexpectedly hospitalized and then out of work for six weeks, many donated their paid time off so I could continue to receive my full salary during my recovery. I sobbed with relief when my boss called to tell me this because I knew I only had a week of personal time and was worried about income. Last year they donated supplies for a local animal rescue. Each year in December, our staff volunteer at a local city mission when the mission has its annual “toy store” for families in need. While my wheelchair was in the shop for repairs (again!) this past week, several colleagues took turns helping me in and out of my vehicle so I could get some work done in the office.

We are a small office – less than twenty people – so we have the chance to get to interact with everyone on various projects or committees. We are professional, diligent and capable of hard work, but as a group we are also able to have fun.

Every other week in the summer months we grill lunch on Fridays for “Hot Diggety Dog Days.” Last winter we learned how competitive some of our colleagues are when we moved the bi-weekly lunches indoors and tried team trivia over pizza. In the weeks leading up to Christmas, people take turns posing our office elf before they go home so we will be surprised the next day. I worked for almost eight years in an office where fun was not encouraged often, so this atmosphere is a welcome change.

When I first learned I was going to Australia, I quickly told everyone at work. As plans came together, I would share my updates. Everyone was enthusiastic and excited, asking me about where I would stay and what I would be doing. They celebrated my success as I raised funds for the trip. I would check my personal email on lunch and often news of a generous donation would bring me to tears. I cried many days last November and December – tears of overwhelming gratitude every time someone made a donation.

Then the week before Christmas, Melissa came to me with a card. Once again, my colleagues and friends caused me to sob when I opened the card and learned of their generous assistance. The messages on the card were encouraging and reminded me once again how blessed I am to spend each day with supportive and charitable people.

Tonight our team will gather for the Constance Laymon Personal Assistant Recognition Awards. In 2010, Constance created this annual event while she was CEO. She envisioned a ceremony which would allow Consumers the opportunity to spotlight the exceptional work performed by the PAs they employ. Following her death in 2012, this ceremony was renamed in honor of our friend and former colleague.

As the audience applauds our Consumer’s exemplary employees, I will also be giving silent thanks for my fellow colleagues.

Anne, Archana, Ben, Carol, Chris, Elizabeth, Jordan, Karen, Libby, Luci, MJ, Margaret, Margie, Melissa, Naomi, Sally, Suzanne and Thabie – every day you make me want to do more and strive harder for excellence. You make me smile when I am discouraged or frustrated. You provide comfort when I am struggling, and you give assistance freely whenever it is needed. Thank you for your support in helping me share the message of self-direction with others!

 

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